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TESTICULAR CANCER Testicular cancer occurs in the testicles (testes), which are located inside the scrotum, a loose bag of skin underneath the penis. The testicles produce male sex hormones and sperm for reproduction. Testicular cancer is highly treatable, even when cancer has spread beyond the testicle. Depending on the type and stage of testicular cancer, you may receive one of several treatments, or a combination. Symptoms • A n enlarged testicle or a small lump or area of hardness are the first signs of testicular cancer • A feeling of heaviness in the scrotum • A dull ache in the abdomen or groin • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or the scrotum • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts • Back pain Cancer usually affects only one testicle. Causes It's not clear what causes testicular cancer in most cases. Doctors know that testicular cancer occurs when healthy cells in a testicle become altered. Healthy cells grow and divide in an orderly way to keep your body functioning normally. But sometimes some cells develop abnormalities, causing this growth to get out of control — these cancer cells continue dividing even when new cells aren't needed. The accumulating cells form a mass in the testicle. Nearly all testicular cancers begin in the germ cells — the cells in the testicles that produce immature sperm. What causes germ cells to become abnormal and develop into cancer isn't known. Risk factors Factors that may increase your risk of testicular cancer include: • An undescended testicle (cryptorchidism). The testes form in the abdominal area during fetal development and usually descend into the scrotum before birth. Men who have a testicle that never descended are at greater risk of testicular cancer than are men whose testicles descended normally. • Abnormal testicle development. Conditions that cause testicles to develop abnormally, such as Klinefelter syndrome, may increase your risk of testicular cancer. • Family history. If family members have had testicular cancer, you may have an increased risk. • Age. Testicular cancer affects teens and younger men, particularly those between ages 15 and 35. However, it can occur at any age. • Race. Testicular cancer is more common in white men than in black men. Prevention There's no way to prevent testicular cancer. Self-examinations to identify testicular cancer at its earliest stage. Diagnosis In some cases men discover testicular cancer themselves, either unintentionally or while doing a testicular self-examination to check for lumps. In other cases, your doctor may detect a lump during a routine physical exam. To determine whether a lump is testicular cancer, your doctor may recommend: • Ultrasound. An ultrasound test can help your doctor determine the nature of any testicular lumps, such as whether the lumps are solid or fluid-filled. An ultrasound also tells your doctor whether lumps are inside or outside of the testicle. • Blood tests Type of cancer Your extracted testicle will be analyzed to determine the type of testicular cancer. The type of testicular cancer you have determines your treatment and your prognosis. In general, there are two types of testicular cancer: • Seminoma. Seminoma tumors occur in all age groups, but if an older man develops testicular cancer, it is more likely to be seminoma. Seminomas, in general, aren't as aggressive as nonseminomas. • Nonseminoma. Nonseminoma tumors tend to develop earlier in life and grow and spread rapidly. Several different types of nonseminoma tumors exist, including choriocarcinoma, embryonal carcinoma, teratoma and yolk sac tumor. Staging the cancer Once your doctor confirms your diagnosis, the next step is to determine the extent (stage) of the cancer. To determine whether cancer has spread outside of your testicle, you may undergo: • Computerized tomography (CT) scan • Blood tests. After these tests, your testicular cancer is assigned a stage. The stage helps determine what treatments are best for you. The stages of testicular cancer are indicated by Roman numerals that range from 0 to III, with the lowest stages indicating cancer that is limited to the area around the testicle. By stage III, the cancer is considered advanced and may have spread to other areas of the body, such as the lungs. Treatment The options for treating testicular cancer depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer, overall health. • Surgery to remove your testicle (radical inguinal orchiectomy) is the primary treatment for nearly all stages and types of testicular cancer. • Surgery to remove nearby lymph nodes (retroperitoneal lymph node dissection) • Radiation therapy: Radiation therapy uses high-powered energy beams, such as X-rays, to kill cancer cells. Radiation therapy is a treatment option that's sometimes used in people who have the seminoma type of testicular cancer. • Chemotherapy treatment uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs travel throughout your body to kill cancer cells that may have migrated from the original tumor. Side effects of chemotherapy are depend on the specific drugs being used. Ask your doctor what to expect. Common side effects include • Fatigue, nausea, hair loss and an increased risk of infection. There are medications and treatments available that reduce some of the side effects of chemotherapy. • Chemotherapy may also lead to infertility in some men, which can be permanent in some cases. Talk to your doctor about your options for preserving your sperm before beginning chemotherapy. TESTICULAR CANCER TREATMENT IN JALANDHAR
TESTICULAR CANCER Testicular cancer occurs in the testicles (testes), which are located inside the scrotum, a loose bag of skin underneath the penis. The testicles produce male sex hormones and sperm for reproduction. Testicular cancer is highly treatable, even when cancer has spread beyond the testicle. Depending on the type and stage of testicular cancer, you may receive one of several treatments, or a combination. Symptoms • A n enlarged testicle or a small lump or area of hardness are the first signs of testicular cancer • A feeling of heaviness in the scrotum • A dull ache in the abdomen or groin • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or the scrotum • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts • Back pain Cancer usually affects only one testicle. Causes It's not clear what causes testicular cancer in most cases. Doctors know that testicular cancer occurs when healthy cells in a testicle become altered. Healthy cells grow and divide in an orderly way to keep your body functioning normally. But sometimes some cells develop abnormalities, causing this growth to get out of control — these cancer cells continue dividing even when new cells aren't needed. The accumulating cells form a mass in the testicle. Nearly all testicular cancers begin in the germ cells — the cells in the testicles that produce immature sperm. What causes germ cells to become abnormal and develop into cancer isn't known. TESTICULAR CANCER TREATMENT IN JALANDHAR
TESTICULAR CANCER Testicular cancer occurs in the testicles (testes), which are located inside the scrotum, a loose bag of skin underneath the penis. The testicles produce male sex hormones and sperm for reproduction. Testicular cancer is highly treatable, even when cancer has spread beyond the testicle. Depending on the type and stage of testicular cancer, you may receive one of several treatments, or a combination. Symptoms • A n enlarged testicle or a small lump or area of hardness are the first signs of testicular cancer • A feeling of heaviness in the scrotum • A dull ache in the abdomen or groin • A sudden collection of fluid in the scrotum • Pain or discomfort in a testicle or the scrotum • Enlargement or tenderness of the breasts • Back pain Cancer usually affects only one testicle. Causes It's not clear what causes testicular cancer in most cases. Doctors know that testicular cancer occurs when healthy cells in a testicle become altered. Healthy cells grow and divide in an orderly way to keep your body functioning normally. But sometimes some cells develop abnormalities, causing this growth to get out of control — these cancer cells continue dividing even when new cells aren't needed. The accumulating cells form a mass in the testicle. Nearly all testicular cancers begin in the germ cells — the cells in the testicles that produce immature sperm. What causes germ cells to become abnormal and develop into cancer isn't known. Risk factors Factors that may increase your risk of testicular cancer include: • An undescended testicle (cryptorchidism). The testes form in the abdominal area during fetal development and usually descend into the scrotum before birth. Men who have a testicle that never descended are at greater risk of testicular cancer than are men whose testicles descended normally. • Abnormal testicle development. Conditions that cause testicles to develop abnormally, such as Klinefelter syndrome, may increase your risk of testicular cancer. • Family history. If family members have had testicular cancer, you may have an increased risk. • Age. Testicular cancer affects teens and younger men, particularly those between ages 15 and 35. However, it can occur at any age. • Race. Testicular cancer is more common in white men than in black men. Prevention There's no way to prevent testicular cancer. TESTICULAR CANCER TREATMENT IN JALANDHAR
Bhargava Hospital Many hospitals for piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ), which provide comprehensive care services, Healing hands clinic is one such specialty center which was founded by Dr. Rupinder Bhargava, one of India’s leading Cancer Specialist Doctor. Piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) or hemorrhoids, as they may be known in medical terms, are caused by swelling of the blood vessels in the anal canal. Though exact cause of the piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) is not identified, it is often associated with causes such as poor fibre content in diet, work activities which may involve lifting of heavy objects, family history, and so on. The changing lifestyle and dietary habits of people has significantly affected the number of piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) cases. Though piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) may exist in every individual, they require medical intervention when the situation worsens, such as bleeding, blood in stool, or pain during defecation, and so on. Pune city, which has a fast growing young generation and is popular destination among both the domestic and the international students and tourists, also has some of the world class healthcare facilities. These hospitals provide a comprehensive collection of medical treatments and services for patients suffering from piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) too. Hemorrhoids doctor in jalandhar Hemorrhoids treatment in jalandhar
Bhargava Hospital Many hospitals for piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ), which provide comprehensive care services, Healing hands clinic is one such specialty center which was founded by Dr. Rupinder Bhargava, one of India’s leading Cancer Specialist Doctor. Piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) or hemorrhoids, as they may be known in medical terms, are caused by swelling of the blood vessels in the anal canal. Though exact cause of the piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) is not identified, it is often associated with causes such as poor fibre content in diet, work activities which may involve lifting of heavy objects, family history, and so on. The changing lifestyle and dietary habits of people has significantly affected the number of piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) cases. Though piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) may exist in every individual, they require medical intervention when the situation worsens, such as bleeding, blood in stool, or pain during defecation, and so on. Pune city, which has a fast growing young generation and is popular destination among both the domestic and the international students and tourists, also has some of the world class healthcare facilities. These hospitals provide a comprehensive collection of medical treatments and services for patients suffering from piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) too. Hemorrhoids doctor in jalandhar Hemorrhoids treatment in jalandhar
Bhargava Hospital Many hospitals for piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ), which provide comprehensive care services, Healing hands clinic is one such specialty center which was founded by Dr. Rupinder Bhargava, one of India’s leading Cancer Specialist Doctor. Piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) or hemorrhoids, as they may be known in medical terms, are caused by swelling of the blood vessels in the anal canal. Though exact cause of the piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) is not identified, it is often associated with causes such as poor fibre content in diet, work activities which may involve lifting of heavy objects, family history, and so on. The changing lifestyle and dietary habits of people has significantly affected the number of piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) cases. Though piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) may exist in every individual, they require medical intervention when the situation worsens, such as bleeding, blood in stool, or pain during defecation, and so on. Pune city, which has a fast growing young generation and is popular destination among both the domestic and the international students and tourists, also has some of the world class healthcare facilities. These hospitals provide a comprehensive collection of medical treatments and services for patients suffering from piles ( Mulvyadh/Bavasir ) too. Hemorrhoids doctor in jalandhar Hemorrhoids treatment in jalandhar
Maintaining Cosmesis in Cancer in Jalandhar Once diagnosed with cancer , patients suffer at multiple levels and one of them is cosmesis, that is maintaining his or her own body shape and structure as before. The common cancers which can affect cosmesis are cancer of breast , head and neck cancer and skin cancers. Psychologically , women are affected more than men. The main reason behind the distortion of body image is surgery of the affected area and chemotherapy. Surgery can lead to inequality in the shape and size of the organ affected and can be very traumatic especially in cancer breast when the affected breast is completely removed. Second concern is the sudden and complete loss of hair from scalp and eyebrows due to chemotherapy. Nowadays , with the advancement in technology, optimal cosmetical outcome is equally important as the outcome of the whole treatment. The surgical field has narrowed down from complete excision of the breast to only removal of the lump so that the shape of the breast is preserved. This requires a complete team work between the surgeon and the oncologist. Even for patients in whom complete surgery has to be done, breast reconstruction can be done with various techniques. These days, saline and silicone implants are most commonly used as they are safe and give good cosmesis. Plastic surgeons are also more frequently involved during cancer surgeries so that a good facial and body reconstruction is done in the same go. Chemotherapy induced hair loss is reversible and normal hair grow once the treatment is over. Hair loss can be prevented by scalp cooling during chemotherapy infusion. Also regular oil massage and good diet can help hair grow faster. Thus , patients of cancer breast can maintain good cosmesis with proper treatment guidelines and adoption of newer techniques. CANCER SPECIALIST DOCTOR IN JALANDHAR
Just after your Cancer surgery You are likely to be sleepy. Exactly how sleepy you are and how quickly you recover depends on the type of operation, and the type and length of your anesthetic. People vary in how they feel straight after a general anesthetic. Some people feel fine but others feel • groggy • cold • sick • a bit confused • sad • anxious • tearful When you first go back to the ward the nurses carry on checking you – at first this is every 15 minutes. They gradually check you less often as you recover, so that within a few hours it is every 4 hours. The checks include your blood pressure, pulse, temperature and your wound. You have a dressing over your wound. You might have some tubes near it to drain any fluid that builds up. You have a drip giving you fluids into a vein until you can eat and drink again. You might also have a tube in your bladder called a catheter. This stays in until you can get up to pass urine normally. Pain control Pain can usually be very well controlled after surgery. Your doctors and nurses give you painkillers by drip or as tablets or liquids if you need them. For some operations you might have an injection of anesthetic into nearby nerves (a nerve block). This can work very well to control pain. You might also have a small pump attached to a drip so that you can give your own pain medicine as you need it. It is important that pain is well controlled, so do tell your nurse if you don’t think it is working well enough. As well as making you more comfortable, the painkillers also help you to move around and breathe properly, which helps with your recovery. Any pain gradually gets better as your wound heals. Possible problems after surgery There are some possible problems after any surgery. These include • wound infection • chest infection • blood clots • fluid collection around the wound Your doctors and nurses do their best to prevent you getting these complications. They ask you to help yourself too. Getting up and moving around as soon as possible after your operation helps to prevent chest infections and blood clots. A physiotherapist might also teach you breathing exercises to help prevent chest infections. To help prevent blood clots they teach you leg exercises and give you elastic stockings to wear while you are in bed. Your nurses might give you an injection just under the skin to minimise the risk of blood clots. After some types of operation, you might carry on having these injections for 4 weeks. Before you go home, your nurse might teach you to do these injections yourself. Or a district nurse might come to your house to do them. You might have antibiotics to help prevent infection. You may have them through your drip at first. But once you are eating and drinking, you can take them as tablets. You might also have drainage tubes close to the wound to stop fluid collecting around the operation site. This is important because, as well as being uncomfortable or painful, fluid that doesn't drain away can become infected. Below is a short video showing breathing and circulation exercises after surgery. Click on the arrow to watch it. Eating and drinking again When you can eat and drink again depends on the type of operation you had. Most people can drink and then eat on the day of their operation. After some operations, such as bowel surgery, you might not be able to eat until the next day. This is because your bowel takes time to start working again. When you do begin eating and drinking you might need to start slowly. Your nurses may suggest that you start with sips of water as soon as you are fully awake and then build up gradually. They will tell you when and what you can eat and drink. They might give you a carbohydrate rich drink to give you energy and help your recovery. Getting up and about How quickly you can get out of bed and move around depends on the type of operation you had. For most operations you get up the same day or the next day. Your nurses and the physiotherapist tell you when you can get up. They help you if you can't move around easily by yourself. It is good to get moving as soon as possible. This helps you recover and reduces the chances of other problems, such as a chest infection and blood clots. Seeing people Seeing people after an operation can be tiring. But as soon as you feel up to it, you can have visitors. It might help to tell people beforehand whether you are likely to have a drip or any other tubes so that they know what to expect. This is especially important for children. cancer specialist doctor in Punjab
Is a brain Tumour cancer? A primary malignant brain tumour is a cancer which arises from a cell within the brain. The cells of the tumour grow into and damage normal brain tissue. Also, like non-cancerous (benign) brain tumours, they can increase the pressure inside the skull. Symptoms and Signs of Brain Tumor Severe and Worsen Headaches Early in the morning. Seizures. Motor seizures, also called convulsions, are sudden involuntary movements of a person's muscles. Personality or memory changes Nausea or vomiting Fatigue Drowsiness Sleep problems Memory problems Brain Cancer Treatment in Jalandhar Best Cancer Hospital in Jalandhar
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